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Surface, Effluent, Waste Water

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The measurement of trace metals under the Clean Water Act can be extremely difficult as the concentrations necessary to meet water quality criteria can be several orders of magnitude below those achievable by most commercial laboratories.

Although a select few laboratories can now detect lower concentration of trace metals instrumentally, many still do not have the expertise or ability to ensure reliable low-level measurements from sample collection to analysis.

We specifically clean and test sampling equipment (sample bottles, tubing and field filtration units) to ensure that all equipment used for sample collection will allow for the measurement of trace elements at concentrations required for most surface water criteria. These cleaning and testing procedures are critical to successfully monitoring ambient concentrations of trace metals in surface water and one major component of EPA Method 1669, Sampling Ambient Water for Trace Metals at EPA Water Quality Criteria Levels.

  • EPA 1630 Methyl Mercury
  • EPA 1631 Total Mercury
  • EPA 1631Mod Elemental Mercury
  • EPA 1631Mod Inorganic Mercury
  • EPA 1632 As Speciation (As3/As5)
  • U.S. EPA Method 1638 Trace Metals (Full Suite*)
  • U.S. EPA Method 200.8 – CWA Trace Metals (Full Suite*)
  • EPA 1640 Trace Metals in Saline Waters
  • SM3500-Cr Hexavalent Chromium in Waters
  • EPA 7196 Hexavalent Chromium in Waters
  • Other speciation via LC-ICPMS or LC-AFS including Se, As, V, Mo, Co

* Antimony, Arsenic, Barium, Beryllium, Boron, Cadmium, Calcium, Chromium, Cobalt, Copper, Iron, Lead, Magnesium, Manganese, Mercury, Molybdenum, Nickel, Phosphorus, Potassium, Selenium, Silver, Sodium, Strontium, Thallium, Tin, Titanium, Vanadium, Zinc

Brackish and Sea Water

From estuaries to the deep ocean, trace metals in seawater, although present at very low concentrations, have a profound influence on marine biogeochemistry and function as critical indicators of fundamental processes. Given the low concentration of many of the analytes of interest and a generally poor understanding of speciation within the matrix, chemical analyses of seawater are uniquely difficult. Potential interferences from total dissolved solids (i.e., salts) often prevent accurate determinations of the ambient levels of trace metals, making most traditional EPA analytical methods ineffective.

Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences has developed several metal-specific analytical techniques that overcome many of the problems associated with samples containing high levels of total dissolved solids. By removing the analyte of interest from the interfering matrix through verified sample preparation methods, Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences is capable of producing highly reliable data with very low detection limits for both total and dissolved fractions of the trace metals of interest.

  • EPA 1630 Methyl Mercury
  • EPA 1631 Total Mercury
  • EPA 1632 As Speciation (As3/As5)
  • U.S. EPA Method 1638 Trace Metals (Full Suite*)
  • U.S. EPA Method 200.8 – CWA Trace Metals (Full Suite*)
  • EPA 1640 Trace Metals in Saline Waters
  • SM3500-Cr Hexavalent Chromium in Waters
  • EPA 7196 Hexavalent Chromium in Waters
  • Other speciation via LC-ICPMS or LC-AFS including Se, As, V, Mo, Co

*Antimony, Arsenic, Barium, Beryllium, Boron, Cadmium, Calcium, Chromium, Cobalt, Copper, Iron, Lead, Magnesium, Manganese, Mercury, Molybdenum, Nickel, Phosphorus, Potassium, Selenium, Silver, Sodium, Strontium, Thallium, Tin, Titanium, Vanadium, Zinc